Spider Pictures and Images
Copyright 2002-2014, Dick Locke.  All Rights Reserved.  Contact and Image Use Information 

My main Spider picture page was my hit leader back in the day.  This is spider page 2, featuring close-up pictures of a tarantula and other spiders. My Spider Webs page is here.  Dig the webby wallpaper!


Common House Spider

This guy (probably a gal, I expect that's an egg sac) was hanging out on the back porch late August 2014.  Tripod mounted Nikon D610 camera with the 105mm f2.8 macro lens at f22 and 1/20s ISO 800.  As you can tell by the size of the window screen wires, this guy is pretty small!

Many thanks again to Gil who kindly provided me with the following ID & info:  Your photo appears to show a Common House Spider (Achaearanea tepidariorum). It is a harmless spider in the same family--Theridiidae, the Cob Weavers----as the Black Widow.


Baby Spiders

A few days after the picture above it appeared there was some sort of dust near the spider.  But, looking more closely, there were a bunch of tiny little spiders. I guess that was an egg sac!  Again, look at the screen wires for a size scale.  1/4 second at f22, ISO 400, same equipment as above.


Tarantula!

Tarantula: 10/2007, Davis Mountains, TX.  These are very common in the area, and I've seen several of them walking on the roads.


A Prickly Green Spider (A Green Lynx Spider)

This prickly devil was hanging around my telescope setup at the HAS site 9/2007.  That's a towel underneath. Gil says family Oxyopidae.  Jane and John B. say it's a "Green Lynx, in the genus Peucetia"


Small Green Crab Spider

Jane and John B. say "... a crab spider, maybe Misumenops, but we are leaning toward Misumena."   Notice the interesting design on the back of this spider, as well as the eyes.  Llano, TX, May, 2006.  He took a liking to the cooler top, which made him easier to photograph.


"Banana" Spider - Spinybacked Orbweaver

These little guys are prolific web spinners.  They're smaller than a dime, making their egg pod storage sacks even smaller, and it is very hard to get in focus when these spiders are swinging in the wind.  Thanks to Gil for pointing me in the right direction in identifying this little guy.  Says Gil: ...(It) is definitely one of the orb-weavers, family Araneidae, and (updated) its scientific name is Gasteracantha cancriformis  From my spider book it looks a whole lot like (Linnaeus) -- spinybacked orbweaver


Bonus: Fly!

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Update 1/20/13, 3/11/14, 8/22/14, 9/16/14